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Bodily Fluid in a Patient Room

What is your process for cleaning bodily fluid from a patient room? Does the nurse do the initial clean and then EVS comes to sanitize? Or, is EVS called to clean and sanitize?

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  • Here at Kendal at Hanover Nursing cleans the bulk and we follow up except for Blood ES performs the Blood Borne Pathegens procedure primarily because we have the equipment and we know how to remove blood from carpets, upholstery etc. JoAnn - JoAnn Coulombe
  • At Rutland Regional, it has always been Clinical staff cleans gross amounts of body fluids and EVS disinfects the area. This was developed some time ago as EVS staff has never been privy to a patients diagnosis and was thought to reduce potential contamination. - Jean Ray
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At the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center the nursing staff does the initial clean, EVS then sanitize.

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Responded: 8/13/2019 6:50:05 AM
  • Every Facility I have worked Gross Cotamination of Blood or other bodily fluids is cleaned by the Nursing Staff and Disinfecting is done by EVS Staff. - Louis Giza
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Our Process is the same, nursing cleans the initial and EVS will come behind and sanitize or disinfect the area. It has been this way for many years at our facility, but nobody can tell me why or how this decision was made. Does anyone have the justification? We are starting to get some push back from nursing on this, any information to substantiate this process would be most appreciated.

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Responded: 8/13/2019 7:41:58 AM
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At our facility Nursing does the initial cleanup then sends a JDI to EVS. My staff then goes in and does a terminal clean. Depending on the size of the spill, we use Zorbitrol Plus on large spills and because of splatters nurses don't always get under furniture, floors and walls. We make sure all areas are cleaned and disinfected.

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Responded: 8/13/2019 9:58:54 AM
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Good Morning Eric, I realize that we are probably on outlier here. At our facility nurses are able to request EVS support for any body fluid spill. The procedures are written in a way that the nurses can do an initial clean up if they so desire, but are not required to. Our reasoning for this is two-fold. First, there are too many spills that occur outside of areas that nurses work directly for the practice to be consistent. For example, we don't want to pull a nurse from the ER to clean a spill at a hospital entrance. We'd rather they stay engaged in patient care. Second, EVS techs are the cleaning experts and have all the necessary equipment. It would take a good bit of time for a nurse to gather the needed supplies which may differ based on the spill. And, since it is not their primary work, they would be more prone to mistakes.

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Responded: 8/14/2019 9:19:05 AM
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Here at Conway Medical Center our policy is to have nursing do the initial cleanup and then EVS sanitizes the area whether it be the floor or furniture, toilet, etc. Nursing is responsible for the patient room for the 23:45 hours of the day that EVS is not in the room. There are very valid safety reasons for this process. Some of it falls under the bloodborne pathogen law and some purely from the safety issues of slip trips and falls. On off shifts it may take EVS quite a while to get to a room. Obviously no one wants to clean up vomit or stool. It should not be dumped on our EVS employees. Our patients should not have to deal with the smell, etc from these issues. This is part of patient care.

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Responded: 8/13/2019 7:43:19 AM
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